PHIL Course Listing

Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 100, 3 Credits)
An introduction to the literature, problems, and methods of philosophy. The goal is to identify and consider central, recurring problems of philosophy. Emphasis is on developing awareness of the significance of philosophical problems and learning to offer rationally justifiable solutions. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HUMN 125 or PHIL 100.

Practical Reasoning (PHIL 110, 3 Credits)
An examination of methods for thinking analytically about real-world problems and solving them. The goal is to apply logical arguments to practical decision making. Topics include inductive and deductive reasoning; the properties of arguments; methods of logical analysis; synthesis of ideas; informal fallacies; and the role of presuppositions and other factors in scientific, social, ethical, and political problems.

Introduction to Moral Philosophy and Ethical Reasoning (PHIL 140, 3 Credits)
An introductory exploration of the foundational theories of Eastern and Western moral philosophy and an examination of methods for thinking clearly about ethical issues. The objective is to employ a knowledge of moral theory and the methods of ethical reasoning to address contemporary ethical issues and dilemmas in areas such as business, medicine, information technology, and personal ethics. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HUMN 300 or PHIL 140.

Contemporary Social Justice Issues (PHIL 304, 3 Credits)
Recommended: PHIL 100 and PHIL 140. A thematic exposition of social justice issues. Topics include the relationship of the individual to society, human relationships with the environment, the use of technology, medical decision making, social equalities and inequalities, and workplace issues. The objective is to improve one's awareness of ethical issues and recognize and analyze ethical problems in the contemporary global context through a deeper understanding of ethical theories.

Confucian Practices in Asia (PHIL 306, 1 Credit)
An examination of Confucianism as a religion and as a philosophy and its influences on the lives of East Asians.

Ideas Shaping the 21st Century (PHIL 336, 3 Credits)
An overview of ideas and philosophies likely to affect humanity and this planet in the 21st century. The goal is to identify and understand predominant modes of thought; critically evaluate ideas that affect ways of living; articulate the principles underlying cooperation and dissention among different cultures, institutions, and individuals; and trace the influence of key ideas across various realms of human activity to navigate the challenges of the modern world. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HUMN 336 or PHIL 336.

Religions of the East (PHIL 348, 3 Credits)
An examination of the religions of the East, including Jainism, Sikhism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese religions, and Shinto. The aim is to gain a historical perspective on world events and understand the interrelationships of these religious traditions, historically and doctrinally. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HUMN 348, HUMN 350, or PHIL 348.

Religions of the West (PHIL 349, 3 Credits)
An examination of the religions of the West, including the Zoroastrian, Judaic, Christian, and Islamic traditions. The aim is to gain a historical perspective on world events and to understand the interrelationships of these religious traditions, both historically and doctrinally. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HUMN 349, HUMN 350, or PHIL 349.